Citations

Information

  • Biello, David. “The false promise of biofuels.” Scientific American 305.2 (2011): 58-65.  This article explains the problems that biofuels pose, and the reason why technology is not sufficient enough to support a society run completely on renewable energy.  This article gives good insight on the ethical dilemmas in my field.  David Biello is an accociate editor at Scientific American, and hosts a podcast for Scientific American
  • Cansino, J.M. et al. “Promotion of Biofuel Consumption in the Transport Sector: An EU-27 Perspective.” Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews 16.8 (2012): 6013–6021. Web. 20 June 2013.  This article talks about the incentives implemented by European governments to promote biofuel use.  These incentives helped countries reach a specified goal for percentage of biofuel use.  This will support my ethics paper, showing ways that biofuels could be implemented in our society, comfortable with their current energy consumption.  The authors are part of the Department of Economic Analysis and Political Economy, insisting they are well
  • Kuester, Daniel. “Scientists Genetically Increase Algae Biomass by More Than 50 Percent.” Web log post. RenewableEnergyWorld. N.p., 23 Nov. 2011. Web. 21 June 2013.  This is an article about a recent discovery in algae fuel production.  The post was found using the blog Renewable Energy World.com.
  • Ferrell, John, and V. Sarisky-Reed. “National algal biofuels technology roadmap.” US Dept. Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Biomass Program (2010). This article expresses the positive attributes of algal biofuels and why they should be researched, while also going into depth about what innovations must be made in order for algal fuels to be a potential transportation energy source.  John Ferrell is a member of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, and the Office of the Biomass Program. Valerie Sarisky-Reed is a member of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and the Office of the Biomass Program.
  • Menetrez, Marc Y. “An Overview of Algae Biofuel Production and Potential Environmental Impact.” Environmental science & technology 46.13 (2012): 7073–85.  This article goes into the potential of algal biofuels, and also their potential environmental impacts.  Marc Menetrez is a member of the Office of Research and Development and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
  • Nelson, David R., Sinafik Mengistu, Paul Ranum, Gail Celio, Mara Mashek, Douglas Mashek, and Paul Lefebvre. “New Lipid-producing, Cold-tolerant Yellow-green Alga Isolated from the Rocky Mountains of Colorado.” Biotechnology Progress(2013): n. pag. Google Scholar. Web. 12 June 2013. <http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/store/10.1021/btpr.1755/asset/btpr1755.pdf?v=1&t=hhuuvevt&s=83fac0f4793489d6c2c8627fa85ca969c78fbd62&gt;.  This article talks about a new strain algae found in Colorado, which produces a significant amount of lipids, as well as palmetoleic acid (PA) which has been found to improve the algae with use as biodiesel.
  • Ramachandra, T.V. et al. “Algal Biofuel from Urban Wastewater in India: Scope and Challenges.” Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews 21 (2013): 767–777. Web. 3 June 2013.  This article looks at the implementation of algae biofuel cultivation in wastewaters in India.  It shows the numerous benefits the algal cultivation can have, as well as the potential of the cultivation to provide mass amounts of fuel.  The authors are all apart of the Energy and Wetlands Research Group in Bangalore, India.
  • Singh, Anoop, Poonam Singh Nigam, and Jerry D Murphy. “Renewable Fuels from Algae: An Answer to Debatable Land Based Fuels.” Bioresource technology 102.1 (2011): 10–6. Web. 21 May 2013.  This article goes into the issues that have arisen with current commercialized biofuels, and the reasons why algae is a potential solution.
  • University of Michigan. “Biofuel breakthrough: Quick cook method turns algae into oil.”ScienceDaily, 31 Oct. 2012. Web. 28 Jun. 2013.  This is article explains the a discovery made which converts algae to biocrude, yielding 90 percent of the energy contained in algae, in a one-minute reaction.  The article was published through the University of Michigan.

Media

  • Algae. 2006. Photograph. Flickr. Flickr. 23 Oct. 2006. Web.
  • Jurvetson, Steve. Biofuels. 2007. Photograph. Flickr. Wikimedia Commons. 7 Feb. 2007. Web. 28 June 2013.  This is a close up picture of a biofuel.  It enhances the focus of the article, looking at the potential of biofuels.
  • Seng, Kim. Sugar-Factory-Producing-Smoke-Pollution- Into-the-Earth. 2012. Photograph. Flickr, n.p.
  • Sutton, Ian. Floating Algal Mats. 2012. Photograph. Obern, Australia. Wikimedia Commons. 24 July 2012. Web. 11 June 2013. This picture of an algal mat is used on my site as way to focus in my readers to the true topic at hand: algae.
  • User: Micropix. Green Algae. 2012. Photograph. Wikimedia Commons. 15 Apr. 2012. Web. 28 June 2013.  This is a photograph of the green algae used for the process of converting algae to biocrude in a minute-long reaction.
  • Thomas, Stephen. Earth. 2010. Photograph. Flickr. Flickr. 28 Apr. 2010. Web. 5 July 2013.  This is a picture of earth, used to expand on the idea of environmental effects.
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